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English 9 Unit 1

Page history last edited by Russell 9 years, 11 months ago

 

Fall 2010 Lessons

 


Thu, Sept 30

 

DUE TODAY: Nothing in writing

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: None

FOCUS TODAY: Exam re-take

 

5 minute grammar/usage

 

Today we re-take the exam in groups due to the poor scores by individuals. We will then discuss study habits and the difference between taking an exam alone vs. with others. The score in the grade book will be the higher score between the individual and team version.

 

Wed, Sept 29

 

DUE TODAY: Plot charts for "The Necklace" and "Two Kinds"

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: None

TODAY'S FOCUS: Exam day!

 

5 minute grammar/usage

 

Unit One Exam

 

Tue, Sept 28

 

DUE TODAY: Plot charts for "The Necklace" and "Two Kinds"

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: STUDY (some more)

TODAY'S FOCUS: change in plan ... MAPS testing for mathematics

 

MAPS testing in computer lab for mathematics

 

Mon, Sept 27

 

DUE TODAY: Nothing in writing

HOMEWORK TONIGHT:

  • STUDY for your UNIT EXAM
  • Finalize plot charts for "The Necklace" and "Two Kinds"

TODAY'S FOCUS: Exam prep

 

5 minute grammar/usage

 

Unit One Exam Prep

 

Students write five multiple-choice questions they feel they would find on the exam. The questions are then used in a game-like setting, quizzing students about the stories and elements of plot.

 

Fri, Sept 24

 

DUE TODAY: Two Kinds plot chart finished?

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: Study for your UNIT EXAM

TODAY'S FOCUS: Grammar/usage, test prep

 

Grammar/usage QUIZ #3

Sample test questions posted for practice:

Sample Test Questions – Unit 1

  1. When Rainsford and Zaroff battle to the death in Zaroff’s room, what kind of conflict takes place?
  2. In the first part of “The Necklace” Mme. Loisel is dissatisfied with her position in society; what kind of conflict is this? 
  3. Who is the protagonist in “Two Kinds”?
  4. What is the climactic point in “The Necklace”? How does this point in the story “qualify” as the climactic point?
  5. Which story’s theme involves “walking a mile in someone else’s shoes?”
  6. Why wouldn’t the piano recital qualify for being the climax in “Two Kinds”?

 

 

 

Thu, Sept 23

 

DUE TODAY: Nothing in writing

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: 

  • Study for the grammar/usage rules quiz
  • Clean up your Two Kinds plot chart for turnin

TODAY'S FOCUS: Peer review, topic sentences, conflict, plot elements

 

5 minute warmup

 

A small scoring sheet for the personal conflict paper will be distributed. On this sheet students will check their own paper against the checklist of required elements. Two other students will read the paper and fill out the scoring sheet as well, for a total of three readings, including the author. Students will then state the strong and weak aspects of their writing on this assignment and in general before submitting the essay and scoring sheet.

 

The class will review "Two Kids" in the textbook, discovering setting, protagonist, and conflict with the use of a plot chart.

 

Wed, Sept 22

 

DUE TODAY: Personal conflict paper, final draft

HOMEWORK TONIGHT:

  • Finish reading "Two Kinds" if not done in class
  • Identify the setting, protagonist, and main conflict in "Two Kinds"

TODAY'S FOCUS: Self-evaluation and peer evaluation; setting, protagonist, conflict

 

Instead of class, we will go to a computer lab for MAPS testing. Today: Reading

 

Tue, Sept 21

 

DUE TODAY: Demonstrate you have good work completed on the personal conflict paper

HOMEWORK TONIGHT:

  • Complete final edits and type the final draft

TODAY'S FOCUS: Drafting

 

MR RICE IS OUT TODAY WITH A SICK FAMILY. What follows are my notes to the sub, which will reveal the outline of today's class session:

 

Today is a work day on the writing assignment due tomorrow: PERSONAL CONFLICT PAPER. Each student has an assignment sheet, pre-writing/ideas sheet (it looks like a paper folded into eight sections), and recent draft work.

Announce: The essay is still due tomorrow, typed. Thursday is Open House - get your parents to come. Friday is a half-day and we'll have a grammar quiz. Next Tuesday is our unit exam.

Goals for today:
If you have a full draft and you are "done," compare the draft to the grading checklist on the original assignment sheet to prove to yourself your paper has all the required elements.
If you are still drafting, frequently check the grading checklist to ensure you are including all the required elements. Ask someone who's "done" to read it. Ask the sub to read it.

Today is NOT social time. It is expected that you will work on this assignment until you can show it is done and meets all requirements. If you are confident your assignment meets all requirements and you are "done" then you should read the story "Two Kinds" in the textbook, determining SETTING, PROTAGONIST, MAIN CONFLICTS. Create a new PLOT CHART.

 

 

Mon, Sept 20

 

DUE TODAY: Show you worked on the personal conflict paper over the weekend

HOMEWORK TONIGHT:

  • Make revisions to the "story" aspect to the personal conflict paper
  • Add the "lessons learned" and "how I'll apply my learning" parts

TODAY'S FOCUS: Drafting a paper - checking against required elements

 

5 minute warmup

 

A review of the personal conflict assignment and its grading checklist. Tips on how to check your own writing against the checklist.

 

Work time and teacher conference time r.e. your draft work

 

 

Fri, Sept 17

 

DUE TODAY: Nothing in writing

HOMEWORK TONIGHT:

  • Draft the "story" part of your personal conflict

TODAY'S FOCUS: Step-Up to Writing

 

QUIZ DAY for grammar/usage rules/tips

 

Before writing the "personal conflict" story, it is useful to review how to write clearly. One way is using a formulaic approach to organizing your ideas.

 

Powerpoint on STEP-UP to WRITING 

 

Weekend Homework: TURN MY NOTES INTO A PARAGRAPH OR TWO THAT TELLS THE STORY OF MY CONFLICT EXPERIENCE.

  • ·         Time –
  • ·         Place –
  • ·         Description of surroundings –
    • o    Weather –
    • o    Interior decorations –
  • ·         Other people present –
  • ·         Sights –
  • ·         Sounds –
  • ·         Smells –
  • ·         Touch/tactile (physical feeling) –
  • ·         Taste –
  • ·         Organic sense (nausea, joy, nervousness) –

 

Thu, Sept 16

 

DUE TODAY: "Necklace" plot chart and two reading questions completed during class

HOMEWORK TONIGHT:

  • Start drafting the "personal conflict" story (assigment below)

TODAY'S FOCUS: Locating evidence, writing a personal narrative

 

5-minute warmup

 

Answer questions number 3 and 4 on page 35 as a warmup:

  • How does Madame Loisel change as a result of her experiences? Consider:
    • what she values in life
    • her positive and negative character traits
    • her behavior toward others
    • her outward appearance
  • Madame Loisel pays dearly for jumping to a wrong conclusion. Do you think it ultimately ruins her life or saves her life? Explain your answer.

 

Introduction of the new writing assignment (detailed  below)

 

Students begin brainstorming ideas for their writing assignment.

  • Make a quick list of any and all challenges you've faced in your life, no matter how small or large 
  • Fold a piece of paper into eight equal sections 
  • Title the sections as follows: topic sentence; story summary; time/place; conflict description; conflict type; what I learned; future application
  • Select a challenge from the brainstorm list that can meet all of the guidelines 

 


English 9 Writing Assignment - A Personal Conflict

  • GET READY:  Everyone faces conflicts in life; in fact, they are present every day. You might have to decide whether to argue with your parents or not - that is an internal conflict about which you must make a decision. You might get in an argument with your best friend - that is an external conflict that pits you against another person. Conflicts come in small packages (like when you run out of toothpaste and have to go find some more) and in heavy loads (like if you are a soccer player and you shatter your knee).
  • OVERVIEW: This writing assignment requires that you remember a time in your life that you faced a conflict or challenge. The conflict you choose could be internal or external, it doesn't matter. What is important is that you can provide this key information:
    1. A detailed description of the experience, from the start of the conflict to its conclusion (tell what happened as though telling a story)
    2. Accurate identification of what type of conflict it was (internal or external, and what force you faced, whether a person, a group, nature, etc.)
    3. A full explanation of something you learned or took away from the experience
    4. A statement at the conclusion that reveals how you will deal with similar situations now that you have learned from the original experience
  • FORMAT: Your writing will be in paragraph format. That means we will do some reminder lessons on the Step-Up to Writing strategies
  • GRADING: Grading will be by checklist
    • Student includes a topic sentence at the beginning that states what he/she learned from the experience
    • Student "tells the story" of the conflict/challenge - from its start to its finish
    • Student's telling of the story includes a setting that gives the time and place
    • Student presents himself/herself as the protagonist or main character using first person "I"
    • Student identifies the type of conflict accurately
    • Student explains how and what he/she learned from the experience
    • Student concludes by stating how he/she will react when faced with a similar conflict in the future (or how he/she will avoid similar conflicts in the future) 

DUE DATE: Tuesday, Sept. 21

 

 


 

Wed, Sept 15

 

DUE TODAY: Nothing

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: None

TODAY'S FOCUS: Elements of plot, reading grades 

 

5 minute warmup

Listening to and tracking plot, character, and conflict in de Maupassant's "The Necklace"

Mr. Rice takes notes on the board while everyone listens to "The Necklace" - notes are used to help the class complete a PLOT CHART for the story

 

Display of grades and explanation of how to read them. Things to remember:

  • Grades posted in the classroom are posted by student ID number
  • A blank space or asterisk (*) in the grade book is an assignment I have NOT YET ENTERED in the grade book
  • ONLY scored assignments are calculated into your grade
  • Blank or asterisk (*) assignments are NOT calculated into the grade and do NOT count against you
  • When viewing the grade book, parents are told by the computer that blank/asterisk (*) assignments are "missing" when in truth these have not yet been entered and do NOT count against the student 

 

Tue, Sept 14

 

DUE TODAY: 

  • Plot chart for "The Most Dangerous Game"
  • Reading questions for "The Most  Dangerous Game" 

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: Finish reading "The Necklace" if not finished during class

TODAY'S FOCUS: Homework grading scale

 

Polishing of reading questions for "The Most Dangerous Game"

Mr. Rice explains the homework grading scale, and students grade their own homework using the scale

 

Mr. Rice checks three assignments for the grade book:

  • Weekend homework wherein you tracked and categorized Rainsford's conflicts
  • The "Dangerous Game" plot chart we've worked on in class
  • The five homework questions referring to "Dangerous Game

 

Begin reading "The Necklace" by Guy de Maupassant and start a new plot chart for this story

 

Mon, Sept 13

 

DUE TODAY: Conflicts in "Dangerous Game" categorized

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: 

  • Complete the plot chart handout for Connell's "The Most Dangerous Game"
  • Complete the five reading questions on "The Most Dangerous Game"

TODAY'S FOCUS: Setting, internal vs. external conflict

 

Review of literary vocabulary, with helpful plot chart (PDF):

  • setting
  • theme
  • internal conflict
  • external conflict
  • plot
  • exposition (aka introduction)
  • rising action
  • climax
  • falling action
  • denouement (aka resolution)

Questions taken about literary vocab so far

 

Continue reading "Dangerous Game" 

CLASS NOTES: Continued work on reading questions (same as yesterday's list):

  1. Who is the antagonist?
  2. How do the protagonist and antagonist differ?
  3. How are the two men similar?
  4. Rainsford meets many conflicts during the story - list them and identify each as internal or external
  5. What do you think is the climax of the story? 

 

READING QUESTIONS DUE NEXT CLASS 

 

Fri, Sept 10

 

DUE TODAY: Quiz day!

HOMEWORK:

  • Finish reading "The Most Dangerous Game"
  • Track the various conflicts Rainsford faces in the course of the story. What is the main conflict?

TODAY'S FOCUS: Categorizing conflict

 

Today is school picture taking day in addition to our first spirit assembly. Both of these events severely disrupt our schedule; therefore, the only academic accomplishment expected today is the grammar/usage quiz.

 

Reading time will be given in class to finish "The Most Dangerous Game" and specifics given about the various types of conflict. The conflict information will help with the homework.

 

Track the various conflicts Rainsford faces in the course of the story. What is the main conflict?

RAINSFORD'S FIRST CONFLICTS:

  1. Falls off the yacht into the sea and must swim to land - external conflict - man vs. nature
  2. Differs with Zaroff's philosophy of hunting men and thinks it's murder - external conflict - man vs. man 
  3. << and you keep going from here >> 

 

Thu, Sept 9

 

DUE TODAY: Nothing (late "I Am" poems)

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: 

  • Study for tomorrow's grammar/usage quiz
  • Nothing in writing, but feel free to finish reading "The Most Dangerous Game"

TODAY'S FOCUS: protagonist vs antagonist, conflict

 

5-minute warmup 

 

Check of the plot chart on "The Most Dangerous Game"

  • Exposition with setting and characters
  • Rising action with protagonist, antagonist, and conflict (so far) 

 

Reading of "The Most Dangerous Game" as far as  possible

Begins with Rainsford awakening after making it to land

 

 

Wed, Sept 8

 

DUE TODAY: "I Am" poem project

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: 

  • None

TODAY'S FOCUS: Setting, internal vs. external conflict

 

5-minute warmup

Sharing and discussion of "I Am" poems 

 

Tue, Sept 7

 

DUE TODAY: Nothing

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: 

  • Work on your "I Am" poem project, DUE NEXT CLASS
  • Answer the class notes questions from today's lesson - if desired 

TODAY'S FOCUS: elements of literature: plot, setting, exposition, conflict

 

5-minute warmup

Textbook checkout in library

Introduction of first vocabulary terms with a helpful chart (PDF):

  • plot - the order of events in a story
  • exposition
  • setting
  • conflict - man vs man, man vs nature, man vs self 

Task: Identifying the elements of literature in a short story

  • Read Connell's story "The Most Dangerous Game" from pgs 39-middle of 51
  • CLASS NOTES: As you  read, use the plot chart with your literary vocabulary to record information:
    1. What is the setting? Time? Place?
    2. Who are the main characters so far? 
    3. Are any conflicts introduced?
    4. Who is the protagonist?
    5. Does an antagonist appear?

 

Fri, Sept 3

 

DUE TODAY: "What makes a successful teacher" if not completed yesterday

HOMEWORK:

  • Work on "I Am" poetry assignment - due Wednesday

TODAY'S FOCUS: Personal introductions and the  "I Am" poetry assignment

 

5-minute warmup 

Three-person compare/contrast challenge

Using a three-way Venn diagram, students will explore what traits and experiences they have in common, and what traits and experiences are unique to each person. Findings are recorded by students on a Venn diagram handout and reported to the class.

Introduction of the "I Am" poetry assignment DUE WEDNESDAY

Work time on "I Am"

 

Thu, Sept 2

 

DUE TODAY: Nothing

HOMEWORK: 

  • Browse around the web site to become familiar with it 

TODAY'S FOCUS: Introduction to the class, including content, rules and regs 

 

How to enter class

5-minute warmups

Your questions about the schedule, lunches, or classroom locations

Class rules and procedures

Mr. Rice introduction

Course overview/syllabus

Writing assignment/exit slip:

Now that I've told you about expectations in this class and what it takes to succeed in room 214, take the remaining time to write to me an overview of expectations you have for an excellent, successful teacher. Consider what traits a good teacher needs to possess, and what a teacher can do to help you be a successful student this year.

 

 


 

Fall 2009 Lessons

 


 

Mon-Tue, Sept 28-29

 

DUE TODAY: Nothing

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: Study for Greek/Latin prefix quiz; finish reading "The Gift of the Magi"

TODAY'S FOCUS: Exam day

 

Grammar warm-up: Reminder of Latin and Greek prefixes - QUIZ NEXT CLASS

 

Exam today: All vocab and anything to do w/ any of the three readings we have done

  • The Most Dangerous Game
  • The Necklace
  • Two Kinds
  • Step-Up to Writing 

 

When finished with the exam:

  • Read "The Gift of the Magi"
  • Add notes to your "Vocab" section on "irony" - Include dramatic, situational, and verbal

 

Thu-Fri, Sept 24-25

 

DUE TODAY:

  • Personal conflict writing assignment, in final draft format
  • Reading questions for Amy Tan's "Two Kinds"

HOMEWORK TONIGHT:

  • Study for your first EXAM NEXT CLASS - All vocab and anything to do with any of the three readings we have done
    • Connell's "The Most Dangerous Game"
    • deMaupassant's "The Necklace"
    • Tan's "Two Kinds"
    • Step-Up to Writing

TODAY'S FOCUS: Conducting self-evaluation

 

No grammar or warm-up activity today

 

THURS is ADVISORY

FRI is a HALF DAY, WITH AN ASSEMBLY

 

Self-evaluation of personal conflict story

Work on reading questions for Amy Tan's story "Two Kinds"

 

Tue-Wed, Sept 22-23

 

DUE TODAY: Nothing

HOMEWORK TONIGHT:

  • Work on revising and putting the finishing touches on your MEMOIR (conflict assignment) DUE NEXT CLASS

TODAY'S FOCUS: Protagonist vs. antagonist, conflict, characterization

 

Grammar warmup: Prefixes and their meanings

(If you're interested, you can check out the Greek and Latin Prefixes chart - quite fascinating)

 

PREFIX/ROOT

MEANING

anti-

against

bene-

kindly, good

deca-

ten

dis-

not

inter-

between, among

mal-

micro-

evil, bad

small

neo-

new

omni-

all

para-

beside, beyond

poly-

many

quadr-

four

semi-

half

trans-

across

tri-

three

under-

insufficient

uni-

one

 

Vocabulary for characterization

  • "Round" vs "Flat" character
  • "Dynamic" vs "Static" character

 

New story: Amy Tan's "Two Kinds" 

Questions to turn in (next class you will be given time to finish) as an assignment for the grade book:

  1. Make a list of the characters as the story progresses
  2. For each character, indicate whether you think the character is a major or minor character
  3. Who is the main protagonist? The antagonist? How do you know?
  4. What do you feel is the main conflict for the protagonist in the story?
  5. Is the main conflict ever resolved?
  6. Once you have finished the story, determine which characters are "round" vs. "flat"
  7. Do you think parents should push their children the way the mother pushed her child in this story? How much should parents push?

 

Leftover time will be given to individual conferences with students about how to finish the first writing assignment on a time when you experienced a conflict. DUE NEXT CLASS

 

Fri and Mon, Sept 18 and 21

 

DUE TODAY: Nothing

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: 

  • Continue working on your "personal conflict" story - DUE TWO CLASSES FROM NOW
  • "Personal conflict" story must be typed (double-spaced) OR neatly written
  • If you wish, the questions on "Two Kinds"

TODAY'S FOCUS: Topic sentences and a review of "Step Up to Writing"

 

Grammar QUIZ on action, state of being, and helping verbs

 

A review of Step-Up to Writing (in-class Powerpoint presentation w/ student note-taking)

Strategies for approaching the "personal conflict" writing assignment

Work time to focus on the "personal conflict" writing assignment (described in previous lesson)

 

Wed-Thu, Sept 16-17

 

DUE  TODAY:  "The Necklace"  questions, by end of class

HOMEWORK  TONIGHT:  

  • Quiz next class on action, state of being, and helping verbs
  • You might work on your personal conflict writing assignment
  • NOTICE: The "personal conflict writing assignment is due THREE CLASSES FROM NOW (not two, as originally mentioned). This means for "A" day classes it's due next Thursday, and for "B" day classes it's due next Friday.

TODAY'S FOCUS: Memoir writing; conflict; theme

 

Grammar warmup:  More on helping verbs

Graded assignments will be returned during the warmup

Grades posted and explained

 

Desire and conflict: Have you ever really wanted something, but there were barriers that prevented you from getting it?

  • CLASS NOTES: Write a few sentences about a time when you couldn't get what you wanted, and explain what was getting in the way.
  • How did the situation resolve itself? Did you get what you wanted eventually?

Brief discussion about desire and conflict

 

Begin reading Guy de Maupassant's "The Necklace" beginning on pg 26

CLASS NOTES:

  1. Start and maintain a timeline of the major plot events in the story
  2. Describe the aspects of the setting
  3. Who are the characters, and what are their conflicts?
  4. What do you think is the message or theme of this story, given what happens to Mr. and Mrs. Loisel?

 

Discussion on "The Necklace"

  • Conflicts
  • Plot
  • Theme
  • Questions assigned

 

Writing assignment - A personal conflict

  • GET READY:  Everyone faces conflicts in life, in fact, they are present every day. You might have to decide whether to argue with your parents or not - that is an internal conflict about which you must make a decision. You might get in an argument with your best friend - that is an external conflict that pits you against another person. Conflicts come in small packages (like when you run out of toothpaste and have to go find some more) and in heavy loads (like if you are a soccer player and you shatter your knee).
  • OVERVIEW: This writing assignment requires that you remember a time in your life that you faced a conflict or challenge. The conflict you choose could be internal or external, it doesn't matter. What is important is that you can provide this key information:
    • Detailed description of the experience, from the start of the conflict to its conclusion (tell what happened)
    • Accurate identification of what type of conflict it was (internal or external, and what force you faced)
    • Explanation of something you learned or took away from the experience
  • FORMAT: Your writing will be in paragraph format. That means we will do some reminder lessons on the Step-Up to Writing strategies
  • GRADING: Grading will be by checklist
    • Student includes a topic sentence at the beginning that states what he/she learned from the experience
    • Student "tells the story" of the conflict/challenge - from its start to its finish
      • Student's telling of the story includes a setting that gives the time and place
      • Student presents himself/herself as the protagonist or main character using first person "I"
    • Student identifies the type of conflict accurately
    • Student explains how and what he/she learned from the experience
    • Student concludes by stating how he/she will react when faced with a similar conflict in the future (or how he/she will avoid similar conflicts in the future) 

 

NOTICE: The "personal conflict writing assignment is due THREE CLASSES FROM NOW (not two, as originally mentioned). This means for "A" day classes it's due next Thursday, and for "B" day classes it's due next Friday.

 

Mon-Tue, Sept 14-15

 

DUE TODAY: 

Should be finished w/ "Dangerous Game"

Five reading questions from last class (due after today's quiz)

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: none

TODAY'S FOCUS: Elements of plot, theme

 

Grammar: Helping verbs, with exercises

 

Listen and read the latter part of "Dangerous Game"  with a plot chart to complete

  • Record the exposition/introduction elements
  • Record the name of the antagonist and protagonist
  • Record the conflicts experienced by the protagonist
  • Propose what the climax of the story may be
  • Record what occurs immediately following the climax
  • What is the final outcome or the story (the resolution)?

 

A  few mintues to complete the six reading questions from last class

 

THEME  QUESTIONS for discussion:  

  • What is it that Rainsford learns because of his experience with Zaroff?  
  • Has he changed at all over the course of the story?  
  • Are his beliefs and values the same at the end as they were at the start when he talked about hunting with Whitney?
  • If Rainsford's experience is supposed to be an example, then what do you suppose the point of the story may be? What may the author be trying to "say"  through this tale?

 

QUIZ on "Dangerous Game" and literary vocabulary - open note

  • Student questions taken first
  • Quiz
  • Quiz corrected/graded

 

 

Thu-Fri, Sept 10-11

 

DUE TODAY: "I Am" poem project

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: 

  • Finish reading Connell's "The Most Dangerous Game"
  • Complete the plot chart handout for Connell's "The Most Dangerous Game"
  • QUIZ next class on literary vocabulary and "The Most Dangerous Game"

TODAY'S FOCUS: Setting, internal vs. external conflict

 

Grammar Quiz: Action and state of being verbs

 

Sharing and discussion of "I Am" poems in small groups, then whole class

 

Second set of literary vocabulary, with helpful plot chart (PDF):

  • setting
  • theme
  • internal conflict
  • external conflict
  • plot
  • exposition (aka introduction)
  • rising action
  • climax
  • falling action
  • denouement (aka resolution)

Questions taken about literary vocab so far

Continue reading "Dangerous Game" to the end

CLASS NOTES: Answer these questions as you read:

  1. Who is the antagonist?
  2. How do the protagonist and antagonist differ?
  3. How are the two men similar?
  4. Rainsford meets many conflicts during the story - list them and identify each as internal or external
  5. What do you think is the climax of the story? 

 

COMPLETE the reading of "The Most Dangerous Game" by the end of class. Work on the questions can be done in class, yet if not finished, it can be completed outside class time.

 

Tue-Wed, Sept 8-9

 

DUE TODAY: Nothing

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: 

  • Work on your "I Am" poem project, DUE NEXT CLASS
  • Quiz on action and state of being verbs NEXT CLASS

TODAY'S FOCUS: State of being verbs, elements of literature: protagonist/antagonist

 

Grammar Warmup: State of being verbs, with exercises

Grammar will begin most class days, and frequent quizzes will be given. Grammar examples, exercises, and quizzes should all be kept in a separate section of your 3-ring English binder.

 

Introduction of first vocabulary terms with a helpful chart (PDF):

  • protagonist
  • antagonist

Practice identifying story elements in an episode of "The Simpsons" 

Task: Identifying the elements of literature in a short story

  • Read Connell's story "The Most Dangerous Game" from pgs 39-middle of 51
  • CLASS NOTES: As you  read, use the chart with your literary vocabulary to record information about the story
    • Who is the protagonist?
    • What is the setting?
    • Are any conflicts introduced?
    • Does an antagonist appear?

Further work in class on reading "Dangerous Game" and identifying literary elements in the text

 

Thu-Fri, Sept 3-4

 

DUE TODAY: Nothing

HOMEWORK TONIGHT: 

  • Work on your "I Am" poem project, due TWO class periods from now
  • Browse around the web site to become familiar with it 

TODAY'S FOCUS: Introduction to the class, including content, rules and regs, action verbs

 

Grammar Warmup: Action verbs, with exercises

Grammar will begin most class days, and frequent quizzes will be given. Grammar examples, exercises, and quizzes should all be kept in a separate section of your 3-ring English binder.

Mr. Rice introduction

Course introduction

Introduction of the "I Am" poetry assignment

In-class writing assignment (due by the end of class):

  • Think of someone close to you - perhaps a family member or a close friend. If they were asked to give two words to describe your character - what kind of person you really are, not just what an acquaintance would think, but a person who really knows you - what words do you think they would choose? 
  • On a blank sheet of lined paper, begin writing with "If there are two words that certainly describe who I really am, I think those words would have to be _______________ and ________________."
  • Follow this sentence by using evidence to back up each word. HINT: If you think "trustworthy" describes you, then describe a time or ways in which you are trustworthy. (I mean hey, are we just supposed to take this for granted?) EVIDENCE must be factual - not fictional.
  • Conclude by explaining how the evidence you bring to the table shows or reveals or illustrates your character. HOW does the story you told really back up the word used to describe you? Bridge it for us.

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