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Mystery

Page history last edited by Russell 10 years, 7 months ago

 

Mystery Story Final Draft Self-Check

 

Story Requirements

 

  1. Exposition – The setting of the story is established by describing the place, time, and surroundings. Where and when does your story take place? What details in the opening paragraph give us the clues to time and place?
  2. The Crime – What is the crime in your story?
  3. The Motive – Why did the criminal(s) commit the crime?
  4. Suspense – How is tension created? Describe where tension happens in your story.
  5. Clues – What are the clues given to the detective (and the reader) that help him/her solve the crime? Make a list.
  6. The Reveal – What is the moment in the story that you expect the reader will have an “Aha!” moment and figure out the mystery? Describe that part of your story.
  7. Red Herrings – Describe what red herring(s) you used to throw off the detective (and reader). Red herrings are clues that look good at first, but don’t come to much of anything.

 

 

Paper Marking

 

1.        Write “Dphys” in the margin next to every place you describe a physical aspect of your detective

2.        Write “Dpers” in the margin next to every place you revealed personality and behavioral traits of your detective

3.        Write “Vphys” in the margin next to every place you describe a physical aspect of your victim

4.        Write “Vpers” in the margin next to every place you talk about who your victim was and what kind of person they were.

5.        Write “Cphys” in the margin next to every place you describe a physical aspect of your criminal

6.        Write “Cpers” in the margin next to every place you talk about who your criminal is and what kind of person they are.

7.        Write “MC” in the margin next to spots where you involve minor characters.

8.        Write “W” in the margin next to spots where you involve witnesses.

 

Comparing Early Ideas to Final Draft

 

1.        What aspect of this final version are you most proud of?

2.        What is the one “quirky” behavioral of physical trait of your detective?

3.        What aspect of your story changed the most between the early draft ideas and the final version?

4.        If I compared the rough draft and the final version you brought today, what would be the most obvious difference between the two?

5.        What other improvements would you like to mention to show me that you “finished strong?”

6.        Did you include any irony in your story? If so, what is it?

 

Quick Self-Check of Assignments Due During Mystery Unit

 

 

“Full Circle” work sheet __/10

“Wasp’s Nest” work sheet __/10

“Great Bank Robbery” work sheet __/10

“Trifles” two questions + work sheet __/10

 

Detective work sheet __/5

Victim work sheet __/5

Criminal work sheet __/5

Witness work sheet (optional) __/5

Draft paragraph of the crime described __/10

 

Rough draft of full mystery story

Final draft of full mystery story

 


Thu-Fri, June 4-5

 

DUE: Film review 

 


Tue-Wed, June 2-3

 

DUE: Final mystery story, with draft attached

HOMEWORK: A movie review of the film you watched (details below in this lesson)

 

IN CLASS:

Finish watching the mystery film

10-15 minutes to complete the worksheet for the film (keep it)

 

Transition:

Self-check the mystery story final draft with a feedback handout, then submit:

  • self-check sheet,
  • final draft,
  • rough draft (with comments)

 

Homework for the film:

Write a movie review for the film. In your review, which should be from 3-5 paragraphs in length:

  • Begin by stating in general terms what we should usually expect from a mystery - a kind of checklist people could look for to determine if a story/film really should be a "mystery" or not (do this in sentence form, not bullets)
  • Follow up by stating how the film filled the requirements of a mystery - this section should also be a plot overview that tells what happens and who is involved
  • Now state whether the film failed in any way as a mystery story
  • Give your opinion on the suspense built by the story -- What were the clues? Red herrings?
  • Finally, propose whether people will like this film or not, and why

 

 


Fri and Mon, May 29 and June 1

 

DUE: Nothing due in writing

HOMEWORK: Be working on making serious edits/revisions to your own mystery story, due next class

 

IN CLASS: A mystery film

While watching the film you will complete a worksheet similar to those we did for the readings.

 

 


Wed-Thu, May 27-28

 

DUE: 

  • Copy of your own detective story, printed, DOUBLE SPACED
  • (By end of class) Reading questions and a table of clues/inferences for "Trifles"

 

HOMEWORK: Begin making serious changes and revisions to your story. You will turn in both the rough draft (today's copy with all editing marks) AND your fin copy TWO CLASSES FROM NOW

 

IN CLASS:

If needed, finish reading "Trifles" and take time to answer the two reading questions:

QUESTIONS for "Trifles"

  1. Dramatic irony is when the reader/viewer knows something certain characters do not. What information is kept from the men that we, the readers, learn?
  2. Write out the events of the crime as you think it happened. Perhaps a numbered list 

 

PARTNER ACTIVIY:

  • Check each other's numbered list of events of the crime - verify you agree and make any changes to your own
  • Continue on your own piece of paper, drawing a two-column table
  • Lable the left "Clue/Evidence" and the right "What it infers/suggests"
  • Each clue and piece of evidence the women find can INFER something.
  • Complete the table by filling out all the evidence the ladies find, and proposing what each piece of evidence suggests

 

Partners share w/ whole class

 

Hand in homework/class work for "Trifles" and take out typed detective stories

NO STORY? WRITE MR. RICE A NOTE EXPLAINING WHY YOU DON'T HAVE IT

 

For those who have detective stories, others will check to see you have the key elements of a mystery story!

At least TWO people should read each mystery and complete a response sheet (by following the directions on the handout)

 

Give lots of time to students to do this peer review activity, which should go until the end of class

If finished early, then students should think about what changes need to be made before the final copy is due!

 


Fri and Tue, May 22 and 26 (Monday = Memorial Day)

 

DUE: Worksheet tracking plot, etc. on Hillerman's "The Great Train Robbery"

HOMEWORK: 

  • Type (DOUBLE SPACED) and print a copy of your story, bring it next class. Hand-written copies will receive max 80% credit
  • Finish reading "Trifles" and answer the two questions (at bottom of this lesson)

 

IN CLASS:

Discuss elements from "The Great Taos Bank Robbery"

Plot, characters, clues, red herrings, the "reveal," etc.

 

REVIEW (from your notes, and using the textbook) the meaning of:

  • Situational irony
  • Dramatic irony
  • Red herring
  • Suspense
  • Surprise ending

 

Form small groups of 4 or 5 people.

As a group, discuss the answers to these questions, and make responses to share with the class VERBALLY (written responses will be collected):

Of the three stories we've read so far:

  1. Identify an example of irony (situational or dramatic) in one of the stories, and link the example to the definition of irony.
  2. Select one of the stories and identify TWO red herrings that were designed to mislead the readers. How did each red herring mislead?
  3. Which story had the ending with the most surprise? Explain your decision.
  4. Compare the story that you liked LEAST with the one you like BEST so far. Explain what the BEST one has that the one you like LEAST does not.

Allow up to 20 minutes work time as groups prepare answers to the four prompts IN WRITING. Encourage group members to take turns being "record-keeper."

 

Groups present their findings to the class - the person who wrote an answer should not be the presenter of that answer!

 

Read aloud: "Trifles" by Susan Glaspell, beginning on pg772

 

QUESTIONS for "Trifles"

  1. Dramatic irony is when the reader/viewer knows something certain characters do not. What information is kept from the men that we, the readers, learn?
  2. Write out the events of the crime as you think it happened. Perhaps a numbered list

 


Wed-Thu, May 20-21

 

DUE: 

Worksheets completed for the VICTIM and CRIMINAL(S)

One paragraph overview describing the crime AND  how the perps did it w/o anyone noticing

 

HOMEWORK: If not finished with Hillerman's "The Great Taos Bank Robbery" then complete the reading AND  the worksheet

 

IN CLASS:

Get into groups of 3-4 people to share ideas about:

  • Detectives
  • Victims
  • Criminals
  • The crime 

Give each student 5 minutes to share and receive feedback

Student groups should HELP  EACH  AUTHOR with ideas about plot and character development BE HONEST ABOUT IDEAS AND WHAT DOESN"T SEEM TO MAKE SENSE!

 

15 minutes silent writing:

Now that you have an idea of the crime, you must decide what the CLUES  are that will help your detective solve the crime

  • Outline the possible clues your detective could discover
  • Come up with TWO  ideas for RED  HERRINGS to possibly throw your readers off course
  • Imagine where you could insert SUSPENSE  into your story - how can you build TENSION?

 

Put away stories - to be continued next class.

 

Open textbooks to 787 - Tony Hillerman's "The Great Taos Bank Robbery"

 

Read the background on 787, then read Hillerman's story, completing the a worksheet like you did for the other two mysteries from the textbook

 


Mon-Tue, May 18-19

 

DUE: 

  • A "picture"  of your fictional detective, as outlined on the "Hints ..."  handout
  • Worksheet for Christie's "Wasp's Nest"

HOMEWORK: 

  • Finish creating ideas on the worksheet for your VICTIM  and CRIMINAL(S)
  • Write a one-page overview of crime and how the criminals committed it w/o anyone noticing

 

IN CLASS:

Was "Wasp's Nest"  a better mystery story than "Full Circle"? (Discuss)

Did anyone notice the foreshadowing in "Wasp's Nest"? (At one point, Christie hinted at things to come.)

 

Take out your notes on your fictional detective:

  • How many female detectives are there?
  • What do the various detectives look like?
  • What kind of traits should a "typical"  detective have? What kind of personality? What is your detective's personality?
  • Challenge:  Add one odd "quirky"  habit or personality trait to your detective.

 

Now that you have a basic idea of who your detective will be, decide these two things:

  • Where does your detective live, and why does that make sense for him/her?
  • Where will the crime and investigation take place?

 

(Share ideas)

 

Now start on the rest of your story using the worksheets:

  • Victim
  • Criminals (the "perps")
  • Write a one-paragraph overview of what the crime was, and how the perps committed it without anyone noticing. 

 


Thu-Fri, May 14-15

 

DUE: Worksheet responses for Grafton's "Full Circle"

HOMEWORK: 

Come up with a unique name for a fictional detective, and start building a character by answering the following about your detective:

  1. What does he/she look like?
  2. What kind of person is he/she?  Attitudes, behaviors, other characteristics.
  3. Why/how is he/she involved in this case?  How does the case come to him/her?

Complete the worksheet for Agatha Christie's "Wasp's Nest"

 

IN CLASS:

Was "Full Circle"  a good start to the mystery unit?  Was the solution too obvious?  Were there any effective surprises?  Did the author create enough suspense and tension to keep you interested in the outcome?

 

Read 757-758 from Lois Duncan's "Who Killed My Daughter?"

In your class notes, write a small paragraph (5-6 sentences)  on this question:  Now that you've read an article about a real person trying to solve a loved one's murder, how would you compare Duncan's effort to the efforts of the narrator in "Full Circle"?

 

 

AFTER  SOME  MINUTES:  Continue by reading the introduction to Agatha Christie's "Wasp's Nest"  on pg 759

Find a definition for the word "foreshadowing"  and add it to your class notes

 

Preview:  This is a detective story in which the reader will also act as a detective. Be skeptical, and question things that appear to be true.

Question for the back of your mind:  How is the wasp nest key to the story?

 

READ  "Wasp's Nest"  from 761-767

Use the handout to track information while reading the story, including:

  1. Brief plot overview (what happened)
  2. Characters: victim, detective, suspects, witnesses
  3. Clues, including any red herrings
  4. What is the "reveal?"
  5. What you liked about the story
  6. How the tale could have been made better

 

 

HANDOUT:  "Hints for Writing a Mystery Story" - work on the detective tonight

 

 


Tue-Wed, May 12-13

 

DUE: Nothing

HOMEWORK: Complete the worksheet for Grafton's "Full Circle"

IN CLASS:

 

Begin a new sheet of paper for feedback and class notes

Look at the art on pages 736-37.

  1. What do you think is happening in the painting called Voice I?
  2. What atmosphere or mood does the painting evoke? (What emotions do you sense in the painting?)

Discuss responses briefly. To what extent were student responses similar?

Read pgs 739-740 and use the glossary to define the following in your notes:

  1. Suspense
  2. Exposition
  3. Dramatic irony
  4. Situational irony
  5. Surprise ending
  6. Red herring - a device wherein the author gives a clue that at first looks appealing, but leads the reader or detective in the wrong direction

Read the introduction to Sue Grafton's "Full Circle" on pg 742

READ "Full Circle" from 743-753

Use the handout to track information while reading the story, including:

  1. Brief plot overview (what happened)
  2. Characters: victim, detective, suspects, witnesses
  3. Clues, including any red herrings
  4. What is the "reveal?"
  5. What you liked about the story
  6. How the tale could have been made better

  

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