| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • Get control of your email attachments. Connect all your Gmail accounts and in less than 2 minutes, Dokkio will automatically organize your file attachments. You can also connect Dokkio to Drive, Dropbox, and Slack. Sign up for free.

View
 

APUnit2 UsThem

Page history last edited by Russell 8 years, 5 months ago

 

AP Lang Unit 2: Us and Them


Tue, Oct 18

 

DUE: "Caged Bird" Qs on Rhetoric and Style #5, 7, 9

HMWK:

  • READ Alexie's "Superman and Me", ANSWER: Do you believe that if you choose what you read, this will account for the influence of books on your life, as suggested by Alexie's text?
  • TAS 

TODAY:  "Caged Bird" discussion

 

Mon, Oct 17

 

DUE: "Caged Bird" read, Qs on Rhetoric and Style #1-4 complete

HMWK: "Caged Bird" Qs on Rhetoric and Style #5, 7, 9

TODAY: AP timed essay prompt; "Caged Bird" discussion #1-4

 

Timed AP essay

 

Discussion on Prose's "I Know Why the Caged Bird Cannot Read"

 

 

Thu-Fri, Oct 13-14

 

DUE THU:

  • Read Cleese's "Axis of Evil" and in 1/2-1 page, analyze 2-3 of his examples and link them to the humorous effect in the piece. Use quotes and analysis!

DUE FRI: 

  • Beah speech (as described in Monday's lesson)

HMWK:

  • DUE FRI: Exercise 3 pgs 171-172 - bring completed
  • DUE MON: Read "I Know Why the Caged Bird Cannot Read" and answer "Questions on Rhetoric and Style" #1-4
  • DUE TUE: "Caged Bird" Qs on Rhetoric and Style #5, 7, 9

TODAY: appositives, punctuation and appositives, exercises

 

Thurs:

  • Debrief PSAT if necessary
  • Read LC 167-170 on appositives
  • Groups produce replies to Exercises 1 and 2 (if they're quick, they can try exercise 3 for less homework)

 

Fri: 

  • Groups re-assemble to check homework on Exercise 3
  • Groups produce replies to Exercises 4 and 5
  • Small reflection on appositives -
    • What purpose can appositives have in writing?
    • On what assignment that we have written so far would you have used an appositive, if you knew about its effect at the time? Explain.

 

EXIT SLIP FRIDAY: What is your favorite rhetorical technique so far, and why?

 

Wed, Oct 12

 

DUE: n/a

HMWK:

  • Axis of Evil analysis of examples for humorous effect, DUE THU
  • Beah as President speech, DUE FRI

TODAY: ?

 

Today is the PSAT, so juniors will miss morning classes. Who knows what will happen?

 

Tue, Oct 11

 

DUE:n/a

HMWK:

  • Keep working on your BEAH speech, DUE FRI
  • Look up "Axis of Evil" and discover the origin of the title. Read the speech where it all began from our former President. Note the context of the original speech.
  • Read Cleese's "Axis of Evil" and in 1/2-1 page, analyze 2-3 of his examples and link them to the humorous effect in the piece. Use quotes and analysis!

TODAY: Review of antithesis, parallel structure, repetition, connotative language

 

Wrap-up of Beah and examination of the speech text due Friday

 

Review of rhetorical devices and introduction of a few more

 

HANDOUT: Cleese "Axis of Evil"

 

Mon, Oct 10

 

DUE:

  • Reflections on comments given thru TURNITIN
  • Editorial cartoon essay
  • BEAH: Three of the study questions under VIOLENCE plus ONE question elsewhere - your choice - for a total of FOUR. Answers should be at least 1/3 page in length and include references to specific points in the text

HMWK:

  • Begin writing your speech as Ismael Beah - DUE FRIDAY
  • PSAT Prep: Use QUIZLET and FREERICE to polish your vocabulary preparation for the PSAT, which is next WEDNESDAY

TODAY: An author's choices, audience, logos and pathos in memoir

 

Reminder that PSAT is Wednesday

 

Discussion on Beah, starting in small groups then moving to the large group.

 

DUE FRIDAY: Violence was perpetrated on the U.S. by Japanese forces in the attack on Pearl Harbor, just as it was by extremists in the attacks of September 11. We have texts from two Presidents that respond to violence. Imagine Beah as the President of Sierra Leone, three decades after the civil war and his ordeals as a child soldier. Imagine that, tragically, civil war has begun again, and a massive force of armed men has attacked a peaceful farming community on the outskirts of the capital. In response, Beah decides to go on the radio airwaves for his first speech that directly addresses the new military aggression. What would Beah say? Who would he address? What would his purpose be? How would he persuade? Write the first two minutes of Beah's speech, and use at least one strategic rhetorical technique in that time. (Remember: rhetorical appeals are logos, pathos, ethos. Rhetorical techniques include parallel structure, antithesis, repetition, etc.)

 

SCORING is by checklist (except with regard to audience):

  • Student's rhetorical technique: __________________________________ on pg. ____ paragraph ____ is ...
    • ___ A correct use of the technique
    • ___ An incorrect use of the technique
  • ___ Student establishes credibility/trustworthiness through ethos
  • ___ Student incorporates purposeful use of pathos through connotative language and/or logos through logic
  • ___ Audience is (easily; mostly; somewhat; not) identifiable in the course of the speech 
  • ___ Student makes use of a sentence pattern from TAS 

 

 


QUESTIONS for the BUSH PEERMARK ASSIGNMENT:

  1. In one sentence, what is the student's conclusion regarding the author's TONE in the text? To what extent is the student's conclusion supported? Explain.
  2. Comment on the student's conclusion of the text's AUDIENCE: How solid is the student's conclusion? Explain. 
  3. What does the student say about the text's SUBJECT(s)? List his/her findings and characterize your level of agreement. Strongly agree? Partially? Etc. 
  4. What did this student do particularly well? Identify and explain clearly. Use quotes if necessary. 
  5. In what area is the student's work lacking? Identify one area and suggest how to improve. 

 


 

Fri, Oct 7

 

DUE:

  • DUE BY THU midnight: Log in to turnitin and conduct the peer editing assignment on Bush (estimated time: 15 min)
  • DUE FRI: Read your teacher/student comments on turnitin. Reflect on them and in about 1/2 page propose the "next steps" needed to improve your performance on written work (estimated time: 20 min)
  • DUE FRI: Read the 4-pg study guide for Ismael Beah and think about which questions/issues "speak" to you. Yes, you should be done w/ the book, but you aren't going to be "docked points." The only problem is that our whole-class discussion is hampered by students who have not completed the reading. When everyone finishes the reading, our discussion can benefit from the fullness of available evidence.

HMWK:

  • Didn't do a valid reflection yet? Read the comments on turnitin and email the instructor your reflection
  • Didn't turn in your editorial cartoon essay? Submit it Monday
  • WEEKEND: Finish up Beah and engage in three of the study questions under VIOLENCE plus ONE question elsewhere - your choice - for a total of FOUR. Answers should be at least 1/3 page in length and include references to specific points in the text
  • PSAT Prep: Use QUIZLET and FREERICE to polish your vocabulary preparation for the PSAT, which is next WEDNESDAY

TODAY: Repetition pattern, Beah discussion #1 

 

5 minute free-write time on one Beah study question of the student's choosing.

Open TAS. Look at the sentence pattern on pages 47-9 (pattern #9). Create a sentence that captures your feelings and demonstrates skill in repeating a key modifier.  

Example: The story of Beah’s trials is heartwrenching, heartwrenching in …, heartwrenching …. 

Discussion follows based on the free-writes and chosen key repeated modifier.

Students write their patterned sentence in a notebook that is passed around the room.

 

Thu, Oct 6

 

DUE: Turn in the editorial cartoon essay HARD COPY any time between now and MONDAY'S CLASS

HMWK:

  • DUE BY THU midnight: Log in to turnitin and conduct the peer editing assignment on Bush (estimated time: 15 min)
  • DUE FRI: Read your teacher/student comments on turnitin. Reflect on them and in about 1/2 page propose the "next steps" needed to improve your performance on written work (estimated time: 20 min)
  • DUE FRI: Read the 4-pg study guide for Ismael Beah and think about which questions/issues "speak" to you. Yes, you should be done w/ the book, but you aren't going to be "docked points." The only problem is that our whole-class discussion is hampered by students who have not completed the reading. When everyone finishes the reading, our discussion can benefit from the fullness of available evidence.
  • DUE BY MONDAY'S CLASS: Editorial cartoon essay wrap-up - bring a HARD COPY
  • WEEKEND: Finish up Beah and engage in three of the study questions under VIOLENCE plus ONE question elsewhere - your choice - for a total of FOUR. Answers should be at least 1/3 page in length and include references to specific points in the text
  • PSAT Prep: Use QUIZLET and FREERICE to polish your vocabulary preparation for the PSAT, which is next WEDNESDAY

TODAY: Group practice w/ tone, audience, and good peer review

 

Students are grouped to practice reviewing student work. Focus includes tone, audience, and ways students express their knowledge. Questions mirror those required on the turnitin "PEERMARK" assignment (a.k.a. "peer review") for the Bush post-9/11 speech (see HMWK above).

 

After an informal debrief, students will be shown QUIZLET and FREERICE - two online sources for preparing for standardized testing.  

 

EDITORIAL CARTOON ESSAY EXPECTATIONS: In your paper you should ...

  • Make an analysis of the cartoon, explaining, analyzing, elaborating on, elucidating, commenting on the artwork
  • Include a kind of introduction with lead-in, thesis, and "road map" or outline for the paper
  • Demonstrate good use of diction as it applies to verbs
  • Demonstrate at least one complex sentence
  • Demonstrate at least one participial phrase 

 

 

Wed, Oct 5

 

DUE: Editorial cartoon analysis

HMWK:

  • DUE THU midnight: Do a peer review of the Bush speech on Turnitin
  • DUE FRI: Read Beah

TODAY: Syntax and Diction improvement; last editing steps before submission of essay

 

A handout (available in class) is given for improving the quality of your writing in a few key areas:

  • Diction - improvement of verb usage, substituting "power" verbs for weak verbs 
  • Syntax - suggestions for using patterns such as the complex sentece and participial phrase
  • Editing snafus - common errors students make that can be caught before printing a final copy of your papers

 

EDITORIAL CARTOON ESSAY EXPECTATIONS: In your paper you should ...

  • Make an analysis of the cartoon, explaining, analyzing, elaborating on, elucidating, commenting on the artwork
  • Include a kind of introduction with lead-in, thesis, and "road map" or outline for the paper
  • Demonstrate good use of diction as it applies to verbs
  • Demonstrate at least one complex sentence
  • Demonstrate at least one participial phrase 

 

Last part of class will be taken to complete a small survey - a kind of "temperature taking" of how you feel

 

Tue, Oct 4

 

DUE: n/a

HMWK:

  • Conclude the editorial cartoon essay - bring a hard copy tomorrow
  • Log on to turnitin and do a peer review on Bush's speech

FOCUS: Writing day/drafting

 

Read the paragraph below. What type of paragraph is this? How do you know? What are the component parts that give it away?

 

In the 1990s Hennessey, makers of some of the finest cognac in the world, confirmed that North Korean leader Kim Jong Il was its single best customer, spending $600,000 to $850,000 per year on the company’s liquor. By contrast, the average North Korean citizen is estimated to make $1,000 annually. This type of outrageous behavior by one of the world’s most fascinating and feared dictators is highlighted in an editorial cartoon by Glenn McCoy, published in November of 2010. Through his art, McCoy asserts that the passing of leadership from Kim Jong Il to his youngest son Kim Jong Un is a hasty, haphazard act accompanied by danger. He accomplishes his message by addressing a number of topics relevant to the changeover of power: the youth and immaturity of the younger Kim, the privileges that accompany dictatorship, the haste and immediacy of the changeover, and the issue of N Korea’s nuclear capability.

 

After discussing the sample paragraph and the expository essay due tomorrow, students will be given time to write and conference w/ the teacher.

 

Mon, Oct 3

 

DUE: n/a

HMWK:

  • DUE WED: Editorial cartoon analysis
  • DUE FRI: Reading of A Long Way Gone

TODAY: Editorial analysis and the writing process

 

Read CA pgs 49-50. Then be prepared to explain what type of essay we are writing for Wednesday.

Now read CA pgs 52-53 from “Developing a Core Assertion: The Thesis Statement” the end of 53. How do thesis statements differ for the various essay types?

Finally, read from pg 59 “Sample Essays” down to the bottom of 62. What do you make of the essay? Of the comments from the author?

If we read this memoir with the understanding the author wishes to help us “see” New York, then what impressions of New York should we get? What about Korea?

Extend this idea of memoir as message to Ismael Beah – what

 

Based on the cartoon of Kim Jong Il and Kim Jong Un:

First Steps: Thoughts and ideas

 

Words: childish, spoiled, demanding, fat, privileged, threatening, immature, pedantic, frightening, hurried, impatient, self-aggrandizing

 

Need to know: Current leader of N Korea is Kim Jong Il; questions surrounding his successor; his youngest son Kim Jong Un is a likely successor; N Korea has nuclear capability; N Korea is a closed country, strict military leadership; world sees elder Kim as unstable, threatening; world sees younger Kim as young – immature; elder Kim has threatened military/nuclear retaliation in response to international sanctions, which he sees as “threats”

 

Picture: Drawn as caricatures to look obese – fat cheeks and jowls, paunchy bellies emphasized by small, skinny arms and legs; elder Kim sits on  what appears to be a throne-like chair, giving him a Santa Claus-ish position; expression on elder Kim is one of calm surprise, not shock, looking @ younger; both wear glasses over eyes that are drawn tight – like they’re both taking the measure of the other; younger Kim sits on his lap – drawn in similar fashion, yet wears a child’s pajamas w/ the atomic symbol decorating them; younger Kim appears to hold out his hand toward his father, demanding something

 

Text: “Skip the 'birds and the bees,' dad, and just give me the launch codes.”

 

Immediate reaction: laughter at the way they are drawn – ridiculously pudgy, and both wearing glasses and looking at one another w/ a bit of suspicion; the fact that the younger Kim is shown as a child demeans him – he is presented as immature, demanding, pedantic, hasty; the elder Kim is presented as a gift-giver by seating the child on the lap; elder Kim seated on a throne-like seat alludes to his egotism and narcissism; the demand of the child relates to the way Kim acts on the international stage – he himself is demanding and seen as irrational; the child’s demand is irrational – this child demands to be given responsibility that should come much later in life

 

Step 2: Categorize findings, determine order

 

Youth/immaturity

Privilege of dictatorship

Haste/immediacy 

Nuclear issue

 

Step 3: Drafting

 

Suggestion: If you feel you have a grasp of the artist's true message and purpose, then go for an intro; if not, then skip the intro for now and write body paragraphs until you have explored all of the issues you believe are relevant

 

Starting the act of writing can be tough. DO NOT ASSUME YOU WILL WRITE GOOD STUFF RIGHT AWAY; JUST GET GOING

 

Create body paragraphs using a strict outline for each:

  • Clear purpose/topic sentence at the outset of each
  • Evidence: Description of the aspect of the cartoon you shall discuss/explain/interpret 
  • Commentary/Explanation/Analysis on the evidence

NOTE: Regardless of how you structure the information within each paragraph, you must incorporate these three elements. There is no question that you must inform your reader of your purpose, your argument holds no water without evidence, and evidence cannot stand on its own - you must explain its relevance to the reader thoroughly 

 

No matter how awful,

 

Step 4: Review, then revision

 

Bring in other readers at this point. Now that you have your draft complete, let an adult read it. Let other students read it. Read your own paper out lound and listen to its rhythm and voice. Be honest with yourself about what you've done and get rid of the weak areas. Listen to suggestions but don't act on the poor advice.

 

During the revision process, fine-tune your sentences. Check grammar. Check spelling. Demonstrate better word choice.

 

Fri, Sept 30

 

DUE: n/a

HMWK:

  • By SUN night: turnitin submission for Bush's post-9/11 speech - DIDLS, OPTIC, precis - You can combine all elements into one paragraph-style submission or break out each element by bullet point. Regardless, you need to use full sentences, not keywords or phrases.
  • READ LC Ch2 - This chapter will help you understand that the central skill in the course is analysis, and provide you with an understanding of the depth required for college-level work
  • READ CA Ch3 - This chapter will help you see that successful college-level writing does not happen by accident, but through purposeful planning and a strategic approach
  • COMPLETE TAS Ch2 - repetitions and modifiers exercises - These exercises will help you see that language is like a puzzle and game all at once. Begin to think about how to incorporate the patterns you see into your own writing.
  • BEGIN analyzing your editorial cartoon - for help w/ the analysis, see THURSDAY'S lesson below
  • BEGIN reading Beah's A Long Way Gone by Monday, be at about pg 100 

TODAY: OPTIC of your editorial cartoon

 

NOTE: All students should have a copy of Ismael Beah's A Long Way Gone. The reading is to be completed by next Friday, October 7.

 

OPTIC handout

Period 1 - Overview of OPTIC and 15 minutes working on your chosen editorial cartoon w/ OPTIC. Mr. Rice then took student comments to begin an analysis of a sample editorial cartoon. Unfortunately, the class ended with only the background paragraph completed.

Period 6 - Overview of OPTIC. Sts then moved desk to desk every 3 minutes applying a different element of OPTIC to the cartoons chosen by others. After five passes, sts retd to their own desks and spent 10 minutes on OPTIC on their own, attempting to expand the ideas of others. 

 

Thu, Sept 29

 

DUE: Reading of Bush's post-9/11 speech

HMWK: Have you ...

  • READ LC Ch2 - This chapter will help you understand that the central skill in the course is analysis, and provide you with an understanding of the depth required for college-level work
  • READ CA Ch3 - This chapter will help you see that successful college-level writing does not happen by accident, but through purposeful planning and a strategic approach
  • COMPLETED TAS Ch2 - repetitions and modifiers exercises - These exercises will help you see that language is like a puzzle and game all at once. Begin to think about how to incorporate the patterns you see into your own writing.
  • and ... begin dissembling your editorial cartoon using SPATER 

TODAY: Working w/ visual images

 

Students preview three teacher-selected editorial cartoons, discussing the SPATER approach to them and the background knowledge necessary to understand them.  (Find SPATER under the SOAPSTone approach in the Resources page)

 

Students preview and select their own editorial cartoon from magazines available in the room.

 

Important elements to remember when approaching the analysis of an editorial cartoon:

  1. You must never assume your audience has the same background you do. When providing an analysis of an image, you must provide an overview of the basic knowledge necessary to "unlock" and understand the image. This might mean providing a brief overview of a historical event, current issue, or political policy, for example. After the introduction of your formal essay, you should endeavor to provide the minimum background necessary to understand the image's topic.
  2. The image's topic/subject has two levels, and perhaps three. In the frame of the image lies the immediate image - what you literally see when you look at it. However, beyond the subject(s) in the image is usually a larger subject about which the artist is making a statement. Sometimes there are multiple topics, such as the editorial cartoon w/ Kim Jong Il and Kim Jong Un: Both the immaturity of the younger Kim and the nuclear issue are at the forefront of the image. A background subject is the way they are presented as spoiled, pampered, and corpulent.
  3. Purpose is the artist's ultimate aim - what reaction does he/she desire from the audience? Explore what the artist wishes the audience to believe or do. Editorial cartoons are rarely designed just to inform.
  4. Endeavor to find out where the image originally appeared. Google the artist's name to see if he/she has a catalog of past works. Note the date of the publication from which it came. Determine the readership of the publication. Much can be made from who's reading the publication. Google to find a list of liberal vs. conservative publications. Educate yourself.
  5. Tone can be elusive. Get out your list of tone words and look through them. Lost it? Google "Words to describe tone" and be amazed at the brave new world you've uncovered. Pick a few that seem to "fit" and remember that tone is the author's attitude toward his/her subject. When you look at how the subject is represented in the image, you should begin to unlock the attitude, or at least the attitude the author wants YOU to have. Use the purposeful DIDLS approach if you're stuck.
  6. Effect and rhetorical devices seem to go hand-in-hand with regard to visual images. The devices often inform the effect on the audience. If it makes sense to you to explore aspects of rhetoric first, then explain how those create effect, then go for it. Review the rhetorical triangle. Explore, for example, how the artist wishes to "connect" with the audience. Is there a dominant emotion present in the image that creates the same or an alternative emotion in the viewer? How about logic? 

 

Wed, Sept 28

 

DUE:

  • Folder check of RESOURCES
  • Check of work in TAS (Ch2 Repetitions and Modifiers) 
  • Midnight: Formal SOAPSTone and DIDLS for Roosevelt 
  • Midnight: Formal SPATER Ut's "The Terror of War"
  • Midnight: Rhetorical precis for "Saigon Execution"

HMWK:

  • CA - Bush - "Address to Joint Session of Congress" (2001 argument)

TODAY: work day

 

Roosevelt

Ut

Adams

 

Notebook check: primarily the resources section

 

A peek at The Art of Styling Sentences work

 

Franklin's "Join or Die"

 

Franklin’s cartoon “Join or Die,” created during the approach of the French and Indian War, aims to pose to the American colonies an urgent necessity to join together in common defense or perish as separate entities. A larger implication for this image is the idea that joining together makes one stronger as a whole; existing independently leaves one vulnerable. Franklin’s purpose is to create a sense of urgency in his audience. The myth that a cut-up snake that is re-assembled before sundown will come back to life relates to the approaching war. Sundown would be the arrival of war, and the parts of the cut-up snake are the individual colonies. Franklin’s knowledge of his audience’s own mythology helps provide the urgency needed to drive the colonies together – to create a common defense. The image of the snake is also used as a symbol of danger for the enemy: The snake generally invokes fear, and if the colonies – the cut-up parts – join together before sundown – before war arrives – then they shall be a fearful, dangerous adversary. Franklin’s cartoon was published for multiple audiences, but designed to reach both the literate and illiterate. The snake’s parts, with their accompanying state abbreviations, would be easily recognizable to the illiterate, who would note that separated, the colonies are a dead creature. The reaction is the re-animate the creature by re-uniting the separate parts. For the literate, the “Join or Die” message helps define the perilous potential future.  The image calls for representatives and citizens of each individual colony to put aside petty differences and come together as one, similar to the call given by John Winthrop in his “City on a Hill” text. Rhetorically speaking, Franklin employs logic and an appeal to both the fear and pride of his audience. Logically, if the colonies do not join, they cannot function as one strong entity, and will perish. He conversely asserts that if they do join, they shall live. On an emotional level, as earlier noted, the element of fear relates to the image of the snake – yet this is fear for the opponent of the colonies. For the colonies, uniting will give opponents reason to fear, and this idea imports a sense of pride and strength in the audience.

 

Tue, Sept 27

 

DUE:

HMWK

  • 5pm deadline for Jefferson rhetorical precis
  • Get your RESOURCES in order
  • LOOK HERE: WED midnight Formal SOAPSTone and DIDLS for Roosevelt and Ut's "The Terror of War"
  • WED midnight: Rhetorical precis for "Saigon Execution"

TODAY:

 

For fun, try Googling these items:

  • pearl harbor address to the nation rhetorical analysis
  • declaration of independence rhetorical analysis

 

Here is a rhetorical precis of Roosevelt:

In his “Pearl Harbor Address” of 1941, Franklin Delano Roosevelt provides rationale for and calls for a declaration of war upon Japan. He supports his declaration of war by recalling Japanese diplomatic trickery, explaining the logistics required for the attack on Pearl Harbor and other locations, and invoking a nation’s need to defend itself against “treachery.” Roosevelt’s purpose is to illustrate how deliberate, sudden, and immediate is the threat from Japan in order to unify America’s efforts to answer not only the Pearl Harbor attack, but Japan’s attack on interests in the Pacific as well. Posing himself as the representative and ear of the people of America, Roosevelt’s audience is not only the members of the U.S. Congress, but the population of the U.S. at large.

 

NOTES from 477:

#2 Roosevelt paints Americans as peacemakers and a people who play by the rules. The US had been engaging in friendly talks w/ Japan, yet R shows how, despite our good intentions, Japan intentionally misled us. He mourns for the American lives lost, uniting his audience in grief. Afterward, he aims to establish a sense of immediacy to the situation - he says that Americans have "already formed their opinions and well understand the implications" yet he provides no further details, assuming that his audience will join together to be of one opinion. He characterizes the US as a people with "righteous might" (thereby implying the Japanese are not righteous) and finally unites the nation with God at its back. NOT COVERED: Themes, ethos, pathos

#3 Through the story of the ambassador R establishes that J has no real interest in peace - that its interest was to form a smoke screen to hide its true intention: domination of the Pacific. It's a contrast: The US "plays fair" while Japan is full of falsehoods.  LOGOS is employed as he moves through the geographic logistics of launching such an attack and mentions the other locations recently attacked. He does this to provide a sense of immediate danger. It also appears that his list of attacked locations moves progressively across the Pacific, illustrating Japan's tentacling out with its naval power.

#4 By starting with the independent clause, R establishes the nature with which the US will reach out. The fact that confidence comes first provides the audience with a way to appropriately respond. By providing the ways "we will gain the inevitable triumph" before claiming it, he makes deposits of evidence.

 

Sixth Period Notes:

Pearl Harbor Address (1941)

  • P1 – “suddenly and deliberately”
  • P2 – evidence: diplomacy efforts thwarted by Japan
  • P3 – logical conclusion = Japan is deceiving/tricky
  • P4 – damage caused and mourning of lives lost
  • P5-10 – chronology of other locations attacked
  • P11 – danger to “safety of our nation”
  • P12 – R’s role and decisive action
  • P13 – we won’t forget this
  • P14 – American “righteous might”
  • P15 – will of the people to defend against “treachery”
  • P16 –

Pg 477 2. How does he characterize Amer vs. Japanese? He mentions that we were in “conversation” with Japan over “peace in the Pacific,” and the ambassador even gave a message giving “no threat or hint of war or armed attack” after the bombing had occurred. He paints the US as a peace-loving country by referring to the efforts at keeping peace in the Pacific; however, Japan is shown as two-faced. First, they engage us in peaceful talks, giving “not hint” of aggression, while at the same time they planned and executed this attack. Later, in P11 he asserts that the safety of the nation is at risk, which serves to unite the nation in order to answer any impending attack. Then, in P17 he speaks of the “unbounded determination of our people,” thereby uniting all listeners as the “people” of the US whose perseverance and resolve knows no end and no boundary.

 

ETHOS: How does he est his cred/trustworthiness (draw people to him)

 

P11-He asserts that he knows the opinions of the people and understands them; P12-relates his actions as commander-in-chief; pronouns “us” “we” “our”; claims to interpret the “will of the Congress”

 

PATHOS: Connotative/emotive language

Suddenly and deliberately

Attacked

In P15, R claims that “this form of treachery shall never endanger us again.” Using the word “treachery” recalls for the audience the earlier story of the ambassador, who presented no indication of attack; he acted in a duplicitous manner by acting peaceful yet knowing his country would attack. The associations/connotations of “treachery” also recall evildoers, criminals, and those one might call “scum.” Therefore, there is an immediate association between this filthy type of behavior and Japan. He does this also to imply that the US is “righteous”

Grave danger

Unprovoked

Dastardly

Inevitable triumph

Absolute victory

Righteous might

 

LOGOS: Look for logical evidence/arguments

Lists the attacks that have taken place; why? To what end? He illustrates that the attacks are not only on America, but how broad the geography is. When the audience pictures the wide breadth of the areas attacked, it must notice Japan’s attempt to take over the Pacific theater. He lists the attacks so that they march across the Pacific, crating a sense of urgency b/c the next location could be the mainland. In addition, the chronology

Notes the distance geographically betw Japan and Hawaii to illustrate how it must have been planned/ coordinated

Notes loss of ships and personnel at PH

The story of the ambassador

 

SOAPSTone = bullet list okay, but within the bullets, please use full sentences. ALT=No bullets, but a paragraph that covers each item of SOAPSTone

 

 

Mon, Sept 26

 

DUE:

  • Read Jefferson's "Declaration of Independence" CA

HMWK:

  • Get your RESOURCES in order
  • Read  Roosevelt's "Pearl Harbor Address" CA
  • Look at/read Adams' "Saigon Execution" CA
  • Look at/read Ut's "The Terror of War" CA
  • TUE 5pm deadline for Jefferson rhetorical precis
  • LOOK HERE: WED midnight Formal SOAPSTone and DIDLS for Roosevelt and Ut's "The Terror of War"
  • WED midnight: Rhetorical precis for "Saigon Execution" 

TODAY: SOAPSTone, DIDLS

 

Check out new "Language of Composition" from library

Split into three groups and rotate:

  1. Composes a rhetorical precis for Jefferson
  2. Applies SOAPSTone to Jefferson
  3. Applies DIDLS to sample paragraphs 

 

Fri, Sept 23

 

DUE: Reading of Winthrop (focus on City on the Hill)

HMWK:

  • Rhetorical precis for Winthrop to Turnitin by midnight SAT
  • Read Jefferson's "Declaration of Independence" CA
  • MON: midnight deadline for Jefferson rhetorical precis
  • TUE: Read Roosevelt's "Pearl Harbor Address" CA
  • TUE: Adams' "Saigon Execution" CA
  • TUE: Ut's "The Terror of War" CA
  • WED: Formal SOAPSTone and DIDLS for Roosevelt and "The Terror of War"
  • WED: Rhetorical precis for "Saigon Execution" 

TODAY: Antithesis; parallelism; explaining author's purpose

 

NOTES on writing about antithesis and parallelism in Paine

 

Period 1: 

I call not upon a few, but upon all; not on this state or that state, but on every state; up and help us; lay your shoulders to the wheel; better have too much force than too little, when so great an object is at stake.

 

In paragraph three of Paine’s “These Are the Times That Try Men’s Souls,” the author makes use of two rhetorical techniques in order to support his overall purpose of gathering and emboldening the troops aligned against the British forces. His first technique is antithesis, and there are many cases of it in the first few lines of the paragraph. At the outset, Paine writes “I call not upon a few, but upon all.” He wants all who can fight to answer his call; he challenges them to join against the British. With the antithesis, he first states that he desires not only “a few” to answer the call. This leaves the reader asking what he then wants, and this given in the second part of the statement: “…but upon all.” With this second part, he makes clear he desires everyone who can answer to do so and join the fight. His purposeful use of this contrast strengthens his call – the negation of the few and enforcement of the entirety helps his argument by delineating what is unacceptable versus what is desired.

 

Following his clear call to all to join the fight, Paine employs parallel structure in order to illustrate the equal importance of the characteristics he seeks in bold, fighting men. When he writes “I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection,” Paine emphasizes through powerful verbs the attributes of the man he seeks. He wants the man who can “smile at trouble … gather strength from distress … and grow brave by reflection.” His repeating pattern of verb followed by prepositional phrase helps clarify that he wants men who can face adversity with courage. War will bring trouble and distress, but the men he values will “smile” and continue to “gather strength” during the fight. They will then grow as they reflect on their efforts. The natural result of this progression will be victory, and it is this sense of imminent success that Paine wishes his audience to feel.

 

Period 6:

In his pamphlet “These Are The Times That Try Men’s Souls” Thomas Paine incorporates both parallelism and antithesis to support his overall purpose of recruiting and inspiring men in their fight against the Br. In lines 345-348 Paine repeats the phrase “there are” followed by observations on certain “cases” of history and “people” who look at the events at hand. He first addresses how important the battle is – its importance cannot be understated; no matter how much talk there is, its importance exceeds all the talk. In the second part of his parallelism, he mentions people who are unable to grasp the full gravity of the situation. Both sides of his parallelism therefore, aim to impress upon his audience the full gravity and grandeur of the impending battle with Br. When his audience hears how important this battle is, and they speak of it – they recall that not words can grasp its weight. This effort to rally the troops directly relates to his purpose of inspiring them for the fight. They will feel they are a part of something so important that words cannot explain it.

 

City on the hill image by Winthrop: (in your note books from today)

 

Thu, Sept 22

 

DUE: Reading of "These are the times that try men's souls" by Paine - CA

HMWK:

  • Look for examples of parallel structure and antithesis in Paine
  • Read Winthrop's "A Model of Christian Charity" and write a rhetorical precis (Precis will be due on Turnitin by midnight Saturday - use your notes from class to inform your precis)

Two links to the full text:

And a link to the final segment "City on a Hill":

Finally, a nice explanatory overview:

 

TODAY: rhetorical triangle; connotative language; antithesis; parallel structure

 

SPECIAL NOTE: The Table of Contents in The Art of Styling Sentences shows clearly the different sections of the chapters. For Unit Two in the Syllabus "Us vs. Them" you are only required to complete the Repetitions and Modifiers sections of Chapter 2. The due date is Wed, 9/28.

 

Paine notes:

 

  • compares Br army to a thief - effective comparison, associating Br army w/ criminals who take
  • religious theme - creates an us vs. them based on Heaven and Freedom vs. Hell and the devil = demonizing the enemy; knows his audience and makes it a holy/religious war
  • tyranny and Hell are equated, they are "not easily conquered;" he means to aggrandize the war, which, when won, will mean so much more than just victory here - it will be victory over Hell; what a morale booster!
  • equates Br oppression w/ enslavement - in this segment, very logical, yet connotative language is powerful
  • he says he has no cause for fear - why? b/c God is behind them: logic = how can He not be behind us? and for the army: how can we lose w/ God?
  • Br king = "sottish, stupid, stubborn, worthless, brutish" = blatant emotional appeal that reduces him to a barbarian
  • associates self w/ whoring if he does not fight and supports/sides w/ the king; think of the implications: being paid to allow oneself to be violated by someone as he paints the king = disgusting, unacceptable
  • assoc Br w/ foxes (connotation = sly, sneaky, clever, tricky) and wolves (connot=brutal, ravenous, violent)
  • assoc of Br w/ "murderer, highwayman, housebreaker" = connot of criminal, thief, violence, unlawful
  • knows his audience and history of religious oppression of Puritans; most men God-fearing
  • section on mercy of the enemy = pure logic 

 

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.